Daddy, Do You Love Me? 

I’ve been so empty since the divorce,
My world’s been torn in two.
While you screamed at each other with such nasty words,
I didn’t know what I should do.

Now the fighting is over
And my world’s in tatters
I feel like a puzzle
Who’s pieces are scattered.

Daddy, do you love me?
I know you love your new wife
And your new baby girl,
But lately I’m not a part of your world
Daddy do you love me?

Am I nothing more than a piece from the past,
A past you deeply regret?
Am I just a memory inside of your head
That you’ve been tying to forget?
Oh Daddy, Do you love me?

 
My purpose here is not to put an additional guilt trip on those who have suffered through a divorce. I simply wish to express some thoughts from a child’s perspective. The poem was largely inspired by a girl who was recently placed in my care who came up to me one night and asked me, “Do you think my father loves me?” She is going through what I went through as a child. Parents divorce, then they remarry. Parents usually don’t even consider the pain the children go through in the whole ordeal. But I can tell you from personal experience, a child doesn’t always feel welcomed into the new family arrangement. There is severe pain in a child’s heart when he no longer feels welcome inside his own family. That pain usually expresses itself in bad behavior and defiance.

The sense of rejection only worsens when the adults decide they can no longer tolerate the misbehavior and remove the child from the home by sending him with the other biological parent or to some other placement. As a child, that was my circumstance. I was passed back and forth between my parents, then to other relatives, and eventually I was placed in the state’s care. I think both of my parents loved me, but they couldn’t allow me to ruin their new family situation. There are countless children facing this same scenario. Usually, the children are considered incorrigible when in fact, they are in pain and as time goes on the situation only gets worse. The children often seek to fill the void with drugs and friends who also feel the same sense of rejection.

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About Ken Sayers

I'm currently employed by a children's home where my wife and I care for a cottage of girls who have been displaced from their families. I'm a middle age man with two grown children of my own and one grandchild. I have worked as a United States Marine, a youth minister, a preacher, a childcare worker, and a truck driver. My hobbies include photography, horses, playing guitar, writing, and fitness.
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